Tag: stephen yellin

Solar on the New Municipal Building Would Save Berkeley Heights Taxpayers Money

Solar on the New Municipal Building Would Save Berkeley Heights Taxpayers Money

Thank you for doing such great research on the benefits and costs of solar panels on our municipal complex, Howard!!!

By Howard Lee

During the mayoral candidates’ debate, our mayor said there was no plan to install solar power on the new municipal building because it was “too expensive.” In reality it would save taxpayer money. Here’s how:

I reached out to several solar industry professionals, and they told me that the municipal building roof could host enough solar panels for a 141 kW system that would generate, here in NJ, on a southeast-facing roof, about 183,000 KWh/year. The town budgets about $335,000 in electricity spending (2017 budget), a significant portion of which would be offset by a solar power system. Exactly how much depends on the financing.

A lease with $0 down, which saves taxpayers the least money but removes the need to find funds to purchase the roughly $340,000 system, would save taxpayers around $6,400 in year one, around $7,000 in year 2, with rising savings over time as grid electricity becomes more expensive, amounting to approximately $400,000 over 20 years. A fully-owned system (eg through a loan paid back by savings on electricity bills) could save more than $20,000 in year one, rising to roughly $55,000 per year after 20 years, saving a total of about $750,000 in the system lifetime. These estimates apply even though municipalities can’t reap the same tax incentives afforded to residential and commercial solar customers.

It doesn’t have to stop there.

The electricity savings could be multiplied by adding solar car ports (you can see examples in the L’Oréal office near Lifetime Fitness) and/or by putting solar panels on other township roofs, like the wastewater treatment plant. There is even the possibility of “Community Solar” in which our community can collectively subscribe to solar electricity generated by the town. And… it’s clean energy that could save around 100 tons of CO2 emissions each year from the municipal building alone, a small but necessary contribution to the reductions needed to preserve the environment for our kids.

I support Angie for Mayor, and Stephen and Alvaro for Council, because I know they won’t leave a stone unturned to save taxpayer money and preserve a future for our children.

Originally published in Tapinto Berkeley Heights

Facts Matter: Our History of Giving Back & Commitment to Moving Us Forward

Facts Matter: Our History of Giving Back & Commitment to Moving Us Forward

Angie, Stephen and Alvaro not only care deeply about this town, but each and every one of them has spent years of their lives giving back to Berkeley Heights any way they can. They have volunteered for organizations in town, spent years obtaining grants and other funding for our town and schools, and given back in numerous other ways. In addition, they each have distinct experience and skill sets that will allow them to hit the ground running when elected. Here’s just a little bit about them….

 

ANGIE

    • Has helped our town get grants and other funding for our fields, parks and schools for years.
    • In 2014, applied for a $18,000 matching grant from the Union County “Kids Recreation Trust” Grant Program on behalf of the BH PAL. The grant money was to be used for softball field dugout installation and drainage improvements at Columbia. She also spent 2 years recuperating grant funds not applied for or drawn down on by the Township; pored over the books for years trying to recoup county grant money for the BHPAL. See the 2014 grant application here.
    • In 2004, helped negotiate with Union County to acquire the land that is now Snyder Ave Park, to save it from development and turn it into the community jewel it is now (final acquisition was in 2006).
    • Worked to get a grant for the softball field at Columbia; just a few weeks ago she got concrete donated to be poured at the Upper Columbia softball dugout pads.
    • Spearheaded an initiative to raise $21,000 in 8 months for air conditioning in every classroom at Mountain Park.
    • Volunteer with Sandy Hook Promise
    • Mountain Park PTO President
    • BHPAL Secretary
    • Awarded the “Women of Excellence Award” in the area of Environmental Advocacy.
    • Berkeley Heights Township Administrator from 2004-2007, running business operations, overseeing the departments of DPW Public Works,Engineering, Finance, Zoning/Construction and Public Safety
    • Named Business Administrator of the Year in 2004 by the Regional Gateway Chamber of Commerce.

 

Stephen

  • Part of the leadership team of Stop the BAC (2013), the community group that was formed to oppose the build of the Berkeley Aquatic Center to Emerson Lane; that grassroots group helped defeat the 2013 referendum.
  • Town Communications Committee.
  • Reported on Town Council meetings for the former Independent Press, through letters to the editor, so residents could know what happened at all meetings.
  • Volunteered with our town Historical Society.
  • Applied to join the town Veterans Memorial Committee twice (in 2014 and 2015, but was not approved; was referred for appointment again in 2017 but was not approved).
  • Recycling and environmental sustainability advocate.
  • Works for the Union County Bureau of Recycling & Planning.
  • Worked as the Individual Giving Manager for United Way of Greater Union County; turned around years of decline in contributions from non-corporate donors, generating 2 straight years of increased revenue and a nearly 20% increase in the organization’s donor base.
  • Experience researching, applying for and obtaining grants, building community relations.
  • Served as the Secretary of the New Jersey Employee Charitable Campaign Steering Committee.

Alvaro

  • Served as a Committee Member and Troop Activities Coordinator for Boys Scouts of America, Troop 368.
  • Leadership positions with the Governor Livingston High School Marching Band.
  • Member of the Environmental Commission.
  • Helped initiate the Trex thin-plastic initiative with the Environmental Commission.
  • Ran for Town Council in 2017 with Susan Poage, because he felt he wanted to give back to the community that has given his family so much; he lost by just 7 votes!
  • 25-year career at AT&T, is now Sales Center Associate Vice President; oversees a team of directors and account executives with a sizable budget.
  • Experience negotiating large, complex deals involving many different stakeholders.
  • Strong background in sales, marketing and operations.

 

Warren Development: We’ll Always Stand Up for Berkeley Heights First

Warren Development: We’ll Always Stand Up for Berkeley Heights First

By Angie Devanney, Stephen Yellin & Alvaro Medeiros

Last week, the Township of Warren voted to accept a court-imposed settlement with the NJ Fair Share Housing Center.  This was unwelcome news for many Berkeley Heights residents. As many will recall, this is the same property that Berkeley Heights residents overwhelmingly voted to prevent overdevelopment on Emerson Lane in 2013.  Now we are faced with a project on the exact same spot; Warren Township plans to build nearly 200 housing units there.

Since the proposed development is located in Warren, Berkeley Heights government does not approve or deny any development planned for the parcel.  However, it appears as if the project would rely on sewer capacity from the Berkeley Heights Wastewater Treatment Plant. If elected, Angie, Stephen and Alvaro will unapologetically oppose any agreement allowing Warren to hook up to the Berkeley Heights sewer if it requires a vote by council.

Further, it appears that the current Berkeley Heights Township attorney participated in talks with the Warren Township attorney related to the sewer, despite having a conflict as the son of the Mayor of Warren. While we are not attorneys and are unsure if this would provide legal basis to nullify any agreements that may already be in place, we will certainly investigate if it can be legal grounds to stop the development.

While the settlement was just recently confirmed, this is not a new subject to the Berkeley Heights governing body.  Documents have surfaced revealing that one year ago, in October of 2017, the Town Council, through the Township Attorney, provided a letter stating that Berkeley Heights has the requisite sewer capacity to accept and process the sewage from this planned development in Warren. It was only when the settlement was proposed that the governing body made a public showcase of hiring an attorney to consult on our options. Our elected officials owe us an explanation as to why they didn’t say “no” and why they did not provide residents with any information about the situation in a timely manner.

Our Mayor and Township Council have not been transparent when it comes to informing residents about the Warren Affordable Housing situation.  If we are elected, we will do whatever possible to prevent this project from proceeding. Going forward, we will ensure full transparency and accountability to ensure residents know as much as possible before major developments like this are formally adopted.

Leadership Starts at the Top

Leadership Starts at the Top

By Angie Devanney

Make no mistake about it, I personally know first-hand that our municipal and Board of Education employees, and our volunteers do a great job with the limited resources they have to work with. But being a member of a governing body, particularly one with a small population, means jumping in the car, driving to Trenton or Elizabeth and advocating for County, NJDOT and other state dollars – not missing grant deadlines. It means ensuring all organizations in town are getting what they need to adequately service residents. That is the leadership I believe has been missing. It is time to think beyond the status quo of how “we’ve always done things,” and strive to do better.

As a baseball and softball mom, I have increasingly become disappointed with the condition of our fields over the last decade. I witnessed countless volunteer dads and moms try to maintain the fields, but seemingly, it has been a losing battle. We are a small town where every penny does count. When opportunities to obtain grants are missed that would improve the condition of our fields, our children are the ones affected most by it – and that’s not acceptable. These grants programs are also opportunities to get back more of our tax dollars from Union County. While Berkeley Heights has missed several of these grants, our neighboring towns of Mountainside and New Providence received $300,000 – $400,000 more in recreation grant dollars than Berkeley Heights.

Now our roads are falling more and more into disrepair. During my tenure as Township Administrator, our Department of Public Works’ track record was a source of community pride. Yet today, the Township government has missed 2 New Jersey Department of Transportation (local aid) road grants, once in 2014 and just last year in 2017. On average, these grants are $200,000 annually. Imagine how many roads could have been repaired and reconstructed with $400,000 or more! How can our DPW deliver services efficiently when the overall conditions of our roads requires far more attention than should be necessary just to do basic maintenance?

Likewise, libraries always seem to be on the chopping block at a time when they are needed more than ever helping to prepare our children for the future. That’s why I am committed to advocating for New Jersey State Library Construction Bond Act funds to help offset some of the cost of the municipal complex. I will also fight to ensure that Berkeley Heights tops the list of library grant funds received from Union County in the next coming three years, not the bottom.  We owe it to our library staff and board to be fierce advocates for them and our community.

Regardless of political party affiliation, the Mayor and Council have a duty to work across party lines at both the county and state levels and provide the tools our DPW, recreation, library staff and volunteer organizations need to build better fields, create recreation opportunities, maintain the roads and provide resources for our library.

Leadership starts at the top. That is why I ask for your support on November 6th  to be our next Mayor, along with Stephen Yellin and Alvaro Medeiros for Township Council.

P.S. I welcome your questions or ideas on how we can make positive changes in Berkeley Heights. Don’t hesitate to email me at AngieforBHMayor@gmail.com. 

Case Study in Successfully Negotiating Community Impact Fee: The Park in Roselle

When our team talks about all of the development happening around town in the next few years, we have a vision for how it can be done more effectively.  With over 1,000 new housing units slated to be built in and around Berkeley Heights over the next several years, we must plan to address the impact on roads, fields, public safety, the sewer plant,  public works, and our community overall.

As a first step to mitigate the impact, we will institute a Community Fee on any incoming development to lessen the burden on our town. We will also look for other sources of revenue or areas to ease the pressure on the municipal budget, such as the township sewer plant. Other communities are sharing wastewater services and making long-term investments in energy projects so that plants can become a net-zero energy facilities.

While these may be long-term solutions to ease the burden on our taxpayers, we need to look beyond the immediate future and plan for our children’s future.

That’s why we will institute a Citizen’s Review Committee comprised of different residents from across the community, facilitated by our planning and engineering professionals. This will allow us to assess our needs for the next decade and longer by listening to our local residents and business owners.
This isn’t new territory for us. Our mayoral candidate, Angie Devanney, has experience in helping to negotiate with developers to ensure residents get the benefits they deserve.

For example, in 2012, Angie helped to negotiate a development project in Roselle called The Park, creating beautiful, luxury apartments on the old Roselle golf course. This 60-acre oasis provides a great place for residents to call home while preserving open space for the residents of Roselle. The Park comes with 20 acres of open space and a 3.5-mile fitness trail that is open to the entire Roselle community, and makes it one of the largest preservation of open space in Union County. There are no other sites where such a land mass has been preserved during multi-family development projects.  It took five years, but the end result was something to be proud of. Angie successfully helped negotiated a Community Impact Fee so the developer would may more money to the town for whatever it needed. The Citizens Review committee, a group of Roselle residents and business owners, meeting on a weekly basis for several months, tackled issues related to the project like open space, traffic, infrastructure, walkability to shopping and amenities they would like to see offered at The Park.

With the right experience, proper planning, innovative ideas, and proactively running our government with our community groups, we will be ready for our new future.